U.S. gov’t sues academic publisher over deceiving researchers, readers

U.S. gov’t sues academic publisher over deceiving researchers, readers

The Federal Trade Commission’s job is to step in against deceptive practices against consumers, but suing a publisher, especially an academic one, seems rare. But the agency has decided to act on some egregious behavior by OMICS Group: “The FTC’s complaint alleges that OMICS Group, Inc., along with two affiliated companies and their president and director, Srinubabu Gedela, claim that their journals follow rigorous peer-review practices and have editorial boards made up of prominent academics. In reality, many articles are…

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An unfortunate coincidence

An unfortunate coincidence

Long ago, I did a post called “Machine Readable“. It was about algorithms for search and ads and finding related content that fell into the gap of context and nuance. At the time, I picked on Google because … honestly, it was fun and relevant at the time. Well, after all that time – it’s still kinda relevant, and not just an issue with Google. A friend of mine recommended a particular book, and I looked at the Amazon record…

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One for the Public Domain

One for the Public Domain

Perhaps this wouldn’t be quite as big a deal if: The public domain in the U.S. wasn’t currently in a state of suspended animation due to the Copyright Term Extension Act (do people still call it the Sonny Bono/Mickey Mouse Copyright Act?); and There weren’t those stories (not apocryphal, but perhaps not as common as one hears) about ASCAP going after scout troops for royalties. But it IS a big deal. U.S. District Judge George H. King has ruled that…

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Open Access & Open Ed: from SLA Annual 2015

Open Access & Open Ed: from SLA Annual 2015

I had the good fortune to catch a talk by Scholarly Communications Librarian Marilyn Billings (UMass Amherst), who talked about initiatives and best practices for open access models beyond journals publishing. Learned a lot from that talk, despite my scattered note-taking. Encouraging Openness at your Institution: Trends in Open Ed and Open Access Marilyn Billings Scholarly Communications Librarian University of MA Amherst Textbook Trends The high cost of commercial print textbooks is a major concern for parents, students, and even…

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Returning

Returning

The temptation to include a gif of the Futurama robot, Bender, saying “I’m back, Baby!” is strong, but I shall resist. But yes … I’m reviving this blog to explore issues around access to information. Copyright, of course, privacy and confidentiality, scholarly communication and open access, e-scholarship, speech and censorship. And more, I’m sure. Forgive me as I dust away the cobwebs and scrub away the mold. It may take quite a while to get the lay of the landscape…

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Reaction Round-Up: Golan v. Holder

Reaction Round-Up: Golan v. Holder

In the midst of the SOPA/PIPA protests of yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court released a 69-page opinion, deciding Golan v. Holder [PDF] in favor of the government.  These are only some of the stories, analyses and reactions out there in the press and blogosphere. Some content excerpted following links. Press and Tech Press Ars Technica – Supreme Court rules Congress can re-copyright public domain works New York Times – Public Domain Works Can Be Copyrighted Anew, Supreme Court Rules TechDirt – Supreme Court…

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Going Dark

Going Dark

Like a lot of other sites, this blog will be going black tomorrow to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). Now, this blog isn’t active, isn’t popular, isn’t necessary in the larger scheme of things.  But I believe that SOPA, and its Senate analogue, Protect IP Act (PIPA), would do serious disservice to the open exchange of information and knowledge on the Internet. So, I will stand with EFF, with the Internet Archive, with Wikipedia, and more.  See you…

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Research Works Act

Research Works Act

The Research Works Act is a very small bill, text-wise. Oh, but the ripples … H.R.3699 — Research Works Act (Introduced in House – IH)HR 3699 IH 112th CONGRESS1st Session H. R. 3699To ensure the continued publication and integrity of peer-reviewed research works by the private sector. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVESDecember 16, 2011Mr. ISSA (for himself and Mrs. MALONEY) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform A BILLTo ensure the continued…

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Cultural Gems That Should Be in the Public Domain Today – The Atlantic Wire

Cultural Gems That Should Be in the Public Domain Today – The Atlantic Wire

Cultural Gems That Should Be in the Public Domain Today – Entertainment – The Atlantic Wire This has been passed around, I’m sure. But the geekier parts of me finds it interesting that all of Lord of the Rings and most of the Chronicles of Narnia could be in the public domain by now, if not for the 1976 Copyright Act.

New Directions in Scholarly Communication

New Directions in Scholarly Communication

Open Access Week has started off with a very good webinar, led by Joe Kraus and with presentions by John Wilbanks, Heather Piwowak and Molly Keener. And in the spirit of OA, their presentations are available on Slideshare! John Wilbanks Heather Piwowak – Open research data: fun, important, and in need of librarians Molly Keener – Scholarly Communication: A Changing Landscape Very informative, very interesting … if you’re involved with scholarly publishing or academic copyright, definitely take a look at…

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