Browsed by
Author: madlib

Sharing some legaltech food for thought

Sharing some legaltech food for thought

I have been bitten by a peculiar bug: legal technology. And as much as I am already tiring of such terms as ‘practice-ready’ and ‘disruption of the legal sector’, I am rather fascinated about legal tech, and trying to anticipate changes to the legal ecosystem (firms & solo practices, law schools, courts, bar associations, other professional associations, vendors, etc.). A long time ago, I was a fairly profilic blogger, and that experience led me down some pretty interesting pathways to…

Read More Read More

And You Get An ArXiv, And You Get An ArXiv, And You Get An ArXiv

And You Get An ArXiv, And You Get An ArXiv, And You Get An ArXiv

(Yes, this is old news, but it gives me a chance to use this GIF) Given the concerns over Elsevier’s purchase of SSRN, people have been lauding the arrival of alternative online archives for social science scholarship. Now, legal scholars can rejoice: the Center for Open Science has launched a preprints service for legal research and scholarship called LawArXiv. The open access, open source repository has 3 non-profits and an academic library collaborating on the effort: Legal Information Preservation Alliance,…

Read More Read More

A change of scenery

A change of scenery

I haven’t been very vocal, but I think I have a decent excuse – I moved back to California from Washington around the holidays, and I’ve been getting back up to speed. But coming up this summer, I’m also changing things up professionally by attending the AALL Annual Conference. How different it will be from SLA Annual, I’m not sure, but I’m also looking forward to seeing Austin in all of its heat and glory.

U.S. gov’t sues academic publisher over deceiving researchers, readers

U.S. gov’t sues academic publisher over deceiving researchers, readers

The Federal Trade Commission’s job is to step in against deceptive practices against consumers, but suing a publisher, especially an academic one, seems rare. But the agency has decided to act on some egregious behavior by OMICS Group: “The FTC’s complaint alleges that OMICS Group, Inc., along with two affiliated companies and their president and director, Srinubabu Gedela, claim that their journals follow rigorous peer-review practices and have editorial boards made up of prominent academics. In reality, many articles are…

Read More Read More

An unfortunate coincidence

An unfortunate coincidence

Long ago, I did a post called “Machine Readable“. It was about algorithms for search and ads and finding related content that fell into the gap of context and nuance. At the time, I picked on Google because … honestly, it was fun and relevant at the time. Well, after all that time – it’s still kinda relevant, and not just an issue with Google. A friend of mine recommended a particular book, and I looked at the Amazon record…

Read More Read More

One for the Public Domain

One for the Public Domain

Perhaps this wouldn’t be quite as big a deal if: The public domain in the U.S. wasn’t currently in a state of suspended animation due to the Copyright Term Extension Act (do people still call it the Sonny Bono/Mickey Mouse Copyright Act?); and There weren’t those stories (not apocryphal, but perhaps not as common as one hears) about ASCAP going after scout troops for royalties. But it IS a big deal. U.S. District Judge George H. King has ruled that…

Read More Read More

Open Access & Open Ed: from SLA Annual 2015

Open Access & Open Ed: from SLA Annual 2015

I had the good fortune to catch a talk by Scholarly Communications Librarian Marilyn Billings (UMass Amherst), who talked about initiatives and best practices for open access models beyond journals publishing. Learned a lot from that talk, despite my scattered note-taking. Encouraging Openness at your Institution: Trends in Open Ed and Open Access Marilyn Billings Scholarly Communications Librarian University of MA Amherst Textbook Trends The high cost of commercial print textbooks is a major concern for parents, students, and even…

Read More Read More

Returning

Returning

The temptation to include a gif of the Futurama robot, Bender, saying “I’m back, Baby!” is strong, but I shall resist. But yes … I’m reviving this blog to explore issues around access to information. Copyright, of course, privacy and confidentiality, scholarly communication and open access, e-scholarship, speech and censorship. And more, I’m sure. Forgive me as I dust away the cobwebs and scrub away the mold. It may take quite a while to get the lay of the landscape…

Read More Read More

Reaction Round-Up: Golan v. Holder

Reaction Round-Up: Golan v. Holder

In the midst of the SOPA/PIPA protests of yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court released a 69-page opinion, deciding Golan v. Holder [PDF] in favor of the government.  These are only some of the stories, analyses and reactions out there in the press and blogosphere. Some content excerpted following links. Press and Tech Press Ars Technica – Supreme Court rules Congress can re-copyright public domain works New York Times – Public Domain Works Can Be Copyrighted Anew, Supreme Court Rules TechDirt – Supreme Court…

Read More Read More