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Twitter, LoC and Social Media Privacy

Twitter, LoC and Social Media Privacy

If you have a Twitter account and are fairly active on the micro-blogging service, you’ve likely heard the news: That’s right. Every public tweet, ever, since Twitter’s inception in March 2006, will be archived digitally at the Library of Congress. That’s a LOT of tweets, by the way: Twitter processes more than 50 million tweets every day, with the total numbering in the billions. Hip hip hooray? Well, actually, reaction has been mixed in some quarters with lots of questions:…

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FOIA dashboard

FOIA dashboard

A very good idea … U.S. Justice Department to Create Online FOIA ‘Report Card’ The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) will create a Web site that compares 92 federal agencies’ compliance with the Freedom of Information Act — in hopes that the virtual “report card” will encourage them to up their game in responding to the public. … “The type of scrutiny that the dashboard will foster is also likely to have a favorable impact on the agencies’ compliance efforts…

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Why DRM bites graphics

Why DRM bites graphics

There is so much to keep track of on Twitter (I’m @miss_eli, btw), but this managed to get caught in the filter. An infographic explaining why using pirated movie content can be preferable to authorized content (i.e. DVDs) showed up on BoingBoing last month. (Another version here.) Now there is a similar graphic for audible books, showing why DRM doesn’t work when trying to check out an audio book from the local library. Actually, the graphic specifically cites the Cleveland…

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6 Years Later

6 Years Later

To start this, I am going to be entirely self-serving by quoting myself: California has a large, well-organized state library, which maintains a catalog of material that the state has published, with information on how it can be accessed by other agencies and the public. A recent report on current efforts of state governments to provide permanent public access (PPA) to electronic information found that the state of California has made only inconsistent efforts to preserve access to digital information,…

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CLA Resolution on USA PATRIOT Act

CLA Resolution on USA PATRIOT Act

Released yesterday: October 13, 2009 ‚Ä¢ SACRAMENTO, CA – The California Library Association (CLA) has just announced a resolution calling on Congress to dramatically revise the up-for-renewal USA PATRIOT Act, passed hurriedly in the weeks following the 9/11 attacks. Librarians have been front-line opponents of certain provisions of the PATRIOT Act since its passage. The Act has made it possible, under Section 215, for the FBI to request and obtain library records for large numbers of individuals without reason to…

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From Kumar Percy Jayasuriya of Georgetown Law Library via GOVDOC-L: You may have heard that some law librarians have drafted a petition to ask the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts to enhance the search features of PACER (the database of federal judicial information) and to make it free for GPO depository libraries. On September 11 Erika Wayne of Stanford Law Library, Terry Martin of the University of Texas Law Library, and I will deliver the petition to the AO’s…

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The Curious Case of West

The Curious Case of West

West, now part of Thomson Reuters, appears to be having issues in marketing and outreach. Note the plural. 1) The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) rejected West’s proposed sponsorship of the 2009 Annual Meeting, in response to West/TR’s continued refusal to participate in AALL’s Price Index. [Personally … wow, turning down major dollars in this economic environment? Bravo to AALL for putting its money where its mouth is, as it were.] 2) Both West & LexisNexis expend considerable funds,…

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Methodology, Part I: How to Score the Obama Administration’s Information Policy

Methodology, Part I: How to Score the Obama Administration’s Information Policy

After hearing various piecemeal accounts of how the Obama Administration has been treating government information, it occurred to me that a score card could be a rather useful thing. This is a big no-no in legal and academic writing, but I’m going to start with the caveats: 1) Truth be told, I think it’s a touch early to be “grading” the Obama Administration on much. It hasn’t even been 6 months since he was sworn in as President of the…

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